Reducing and creating straight seams - crochet in the round
For Designers,  For Makers

Reducing/Eliminating Seams in the Round

How to Reduce Seams While Crocheting in the Round

As crocheters, we learn pretty quickly that every crochet stitch is irregularly shaped. Getting perfectly straight edges is challenging, even colourwork can be daunting and hiding seams is nearly impossible… or is it?

No matter the crochet stitch, when working in the round your seam is likely to slant. For garments this means that you may start a seam under your arm for the body, but by the end the seam is halfway across your torso (yuck!). I have good news – it doesn’t have to be this way!

In this post I have outlined multiple ways to reduce the visibility of seams and create straight seams in the round for each of the 3 basic crochet stitches (single, half-double, double).

Let us know which technique you used on your next garment by using #crochetershavemorefun on social media!

PSA – when working increases or decreases these methods may not keep the rounds perfectly straight. You can use these methods throughout, or just on the torso and sleeve portions to keep your seams running under the arms of your project.

Slanted Stitches?

First things first – here is what double crochets, half-double crochets and single crochets look like in the round using the typical slip stitch, ch method, without turning. 

Reducing Crochet Slant and Seam in the Round

As you can see each seam runs up on an angle to the right (if you’re left handed they will travel up to the left). While this may not bother some people, it drives me crazy.

Over years of designing garments I have tried many different techniques – and I’ve picked favourites. Some work the same no matter the stitch, others only work for one stitch.

I encourage you to test out each method using a small swatch, like in the photos, to see which technique you prefer!

For All Stitches (SC, HDC, DC)

Option 1 (my personal favourite): working in continuous rounds.

The best kind of seam is no seam at all! Rather than connecting each round with a slip stitch and chain(s) you can just work the first stitch of your second round into the first stitch of your first round. This creates a spiral or slinky style in your stitches.

How to do seamless continuous rounds in crochet

But what about the jog at the start end of continuous rounds? No problem! Leave a long tail at the start and end of your work and use it to slip stitch to the second stitch from your hook (see photo below for example of how to do it with double crochet). Pull the loop all the way through and tie securely. It’s not perfectly even, but much more even than leaving the jog and is barely noticeable on a full sweater.

Continuous rounds are not suitable for colour-work or stripes because of the jog between rounds. I recommend one of the other options below for colour-work of any kind. You will also want to stay away from continuous rounds if you are doing any lacework or stitch repeats that vary from round to round.

Option 2: Turn every round

Joining with a slip stitch and chains then turning your piece after each round will keep the seam straight and is a great option if you’re designing your own sweater or if the pattern you are using already turns each round.

However, if the pattern does not calling for turning after each round this will not work. Turning each round can affect your gauge and it will make the garment look different because the right side and wrong side of the stitches will be showing every other round. 

Crocheting in the round - straight seam single, half double and double crochet stitch

For Single Crochet

Option 1: Tight slip stitch/chain.

For this technique you will still join each round with a slip stitch and chain 1. However, you will pull both the slip stitch and the chain one tight before working your first stitch.

The seam is still angled using this method, however the seam is much less visible than if you do not tighten the slip stitch and chain.

Reducing seam in the round - single crochet

Option 2: Alternating tight slip stitch/work into second stitch (my preferred method for single crochet).

 

Round 1 – Join previous round with a tight slip stitch, chain 1 (pull it tight), single crochet around.

 

Rounds 2 & 3 – Join previous round with a loose slip stitch, chain 1, skip 1 stitch, work first single crochet into the SECOND stitch from hook. Single crochet around and work last single crochet into/over the slip stitch.

 

Repeat rounds 1-3 until desired length is reached and join last round with a  tight slip stitch.

Straight seam - single crochet in the round for sweaters

For Half-Double Crochet

Alternating tight slip stitch/work into second stitch.

Round 1 – Join previous round with a tight slip stitch, chain 1 (yes, just 1), half double crochet around.

Rounds 2 & 3 – Join previous round with a loose slip stitch, chain 1, skip 1 stitch, work first half double crochet into the SECOND stitch from hook. Half double crochet around and work last stitch into/over the slip stitch.

Repeat rounds 1-3 until desired length is reached and join last round with a tight slip stitch.

Straight seam half double crochet in the round

Double Crochet

Option 1: Alternating tight slip stitch/work into second stitch (my preferred method for double crochet).

This is similar to the above suggestions for single and half double stitches, however you will complete two “normal” rounds and one round where you move forward by one stitch.

Rounds 1 & 2 – Join previous round with a tight slip stitch to the top of the stitch (not into the chain 2), chain 2 (yes, just 2), work a double crochet into the same stitch you joined into, then double crochet around.

Round 3 – Join previous round with a loose slip stitch, chain 2, skip 1 stitch, work first double crochet into the SECOND stitch from hook. Double crochet around and work last stitch into/over the slip stitch.

Repeat rounds 1-3 until desired length is reached and join last round with a tight slip stitch.

Double crochet in the round - straight, invisible seam

Option 2: Chain 3, join to stitch not chains.

CH 3 at the start of each round, double crochet into each stitch around and join with a tight slip stitch to the top of the first double crochet, NOT into the chains.

This method does still have a slight slant, however it is slightly less visible than the normal method.

Double crochet in the round - straight, invisible seam

And there you have it! Many different ways to eliminate, reduce, and hide seams in each of the most frequent crochet stitches.

I hope this helps you on your journey to creating garments you love! Click here to subscribe to our emails to ensure you never miss anything crochet garment related!

Happy crocheting!

Courtney

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